One day, robots may work in zones too dangerous for humans

robots

Washington Post

December 22
Dennis Hong first spied Japan’s ruined nuclear power plant from a bus wrapped in plastic. A hefty layer of protection guarded the seats, floors and handles from radioactive dust. Hong wore a face mask and gloves to limit his exposure. Like the other passengers, he had dressed in old clothes that he was willing to toss after the trip.

More than three years earlier, after an earthquake and tsunami battered Japan’s eastern coast, portions of the Fukushima Daiichi power station blew, blasting radiation into the sea and sky. Today, villages outside the plant still lie as barren as ghost towns. Along the coast, smashed buildings, flipped cars and train tracks twisted like taffy stand as reminders of the catastrophe.

>STORY

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