Tsunami hits Japan after strong quake near Fukushima disaster site

Reuters.com

Mon. Nov 21, 2016

A traffic jam is seen as people evacuate after tsunami advisories were issued following an earthquake, in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture, Japan, in this photo taken by Kyodo November 22, 2016. Kyodo/via REUTERS

By Yuka Obayashi and William Mallard | TOKYO
A powerful earthquake rocked northern Japan early on Tuesday, briefly disrupting cooling functions at a nuclear plant and generating a small tsunami that hit the same Fukushima region devastated by a 2011 quake, tsunami and nuclear disaster.

The magnitude 7.4 earthquake, which was felt in Tokyo, sent thousands of residents fleeing for higher ground as dawn broke along the northeastern coast.

Full Story: Reuters

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-japan-quake-idUSKBN13G2DC

Five Years After Fukushima, Japan’s Nuclear Power Debate Is Heating Up

by Mark Hay

Good



IAEA fact-finding team leader Mike Weightman examines the Fukushima site. Image via Flickr user IAEA Imagebank.

Last Thursday, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe threw his weight behind the redevelopment of his nation’s nuclear energy plants. It was a bold stance, made bolder because he voiced it on the eve of the fifth anniversary of the earthquake-tsunami in northeastern Japan that left 18,500 dead or missing and precipitated the Fukushima nuclear disaster—the world’s worst since Chernobyl and the reason for the eventual shutdown of the nation’s 54 nuclear facilities.

Full Story

5 years after Fukushima disaster, its lessons still speak to U.S. industry

Peter Behr, E&E reporter

EnergyWire: Monday, March 14, 2016

On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Japan’s east coast was designed to withstand a magnitude-7-plus earthquake. A flood wall 18 feet high stood between the plant and the Pacific. But the Great East Japan earthquake that day measured magnitude 9, unleashing a tsunami that topped 45 feet.

The plant was inundated, backup generators were flooded and fuel supplies were swept away. Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) emergency crews soon were without any electric power to run cooling water recirculation pumps to prevent the meltdowns of three reactor cores, explosions from leaking hydrogen, and the second-worst nuclear power accident in history. TEPCO workers, who could not know whether their families were among the 18,500 people killed or missing, had to battle through a horrific crisis they had never prepared for, subsequent investigation found.

 

Story

Robots Sent into the Fukushima Plant Have Not Returned

by NATALIE SHOEMAKER

BigThink

Not even robots can survive within the ruins of the Fukushima power plant. Operators lost contact with the five robots that went in, they are assumed to have broken-down from the radiation.

After a 9.0 Earthquake triggered a tsunami, killing 16,000 people and causing a meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, officials began removing the spent fuel pins (or rods) back in 2013. This project was headed up by the plant’s operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co (Tepco). They have so far removed hundreds of spent fuel rods from one of the damaged buildings, but there are still three more buildings to clear, and locating the fuel rods is proving difficult.

 

STORY

Jun Yamadera, Fukushima tech entrepreneur on challenges and opportunities

I met Jun Yamadera at the SVForum Japan Pitch Night, March 10, 2016 in Menlo Park, CA. He reminded us about the 5 year anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami in the Tohoku region of Japan. His company is developing a cancer diagnostic system, and much of his work has been inspired by the strength and the fortitude of the people of Fukushima. http://www.nowhere.co.jp

His other company, Fukushima Wheel, http://fukushimawheel.org/
developing:
“A specially outfitted bicycle features environmental sensors to measure live city data such as radiation, temperature, humidity, NOX, and so on.”

Both endeavors demonstrate the forward and innovative thinking from the new entrepreneurs in the Fukushima region.

Fukushima Wheel

Akira Tana and Otonowa – Commemerating the 5th Anniversary of the Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan

20160108_MG_2235_TanaEns**_3x6Upcoming 3.11 related events/performances for

AKIRA TANA AND OTONOWA to commemorate 5th
Anniversary of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake/Tsunami disaster.

 

3/11 Savanna Jazz in San Carlos (8pm)

1189 Laurel St., San Carlos savannajazz.com

3/12 “Tohoku Springs Back!: A Fundraiser Celebrating 5 Years of
Positive Change in Tohoku, Japan” (7pm)

At Bower Center, Berkeley 2150 Allston Way
$75 General/$50 UCB students via Center for Japanese
Studies http://ieas.berkeley.edu/cjs/
featuring guest vocalist SAKI KONO

 

3/13 Café Pink House in Saratoga (6pm)

14577 Big Basin Way, Saratoga cafepinkhouse.com
Limited seating, reservation recommended. $15 

Donations will be accepted for the continuing rebuilding efforts.

OTONOWA is: Masaru Koga, Ken Okada, and Art Hirahara
photo: Andy Nozaka

New Robots Deployed at Fukushima

The Wall Street Journal
JapanRealTime

A team of rival Japanese companies unveiled a new family of robots to help workerswith the daunting task of decommissioning the three reactors that went into meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011.

Fukushima operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. hopes to use the robots to begin decontaminating the second and third floors of the reactor buildings sometime after April. The robots are the latest tools developed in Japan’s trial-and-error struggles to clean up the nuclear disaster– which even the most optimistic say will take about half a century.

>story>

7.0 quake off Japan coast triggers minor tsunami

November 15, 2015
The Gulf Today

TOKYO: A powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck off the south-western coast of Japan early on Saturday, authorities said, with a small tsunami observed on one island but no major damage reported.

The US Geological Survey (USGS) put the epicentre of the shallow quake about 160 kilometres (100 miles) from the town of Makurazaki in south-western Japan.

It was centred about 10 kilometres under the ocean floor and struck at 5:51am (20:51GMT on Friday), the USGS and Japan’s Meteorological Agency said.

The Meteorological Agency issued a tsunami advisory as a result of the quake but cancelled it about 90 minutes later.

A tsunami measuring 30 centimetres (about one foot) in height was observed on the southern island of Nakanoshima, it said. No major damage from the quake or tsunami was reported, while a pair of nuclear reactors on the southern island of Kyushu were unaffected, its operator said.

<Full Story>

Japan acknowledges possible radiation casualty at Fukushima nuclear plant

TOKYO (Reuters) — Japan on Tuesday acknowledged the first possible casualty from radiation at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear power plant, a worker who was diagnosed with cancer after the crisis broke out in 2011.

The health ministry’s recognition of radiation as a possible cause may set back efforts to recover from the disaster, as the government and the nuclear industry have been at pains to say that the health effects from radiation have been minimal.

It may also add to compensation payments that had reached more than 7 trillion yen ($76.3 billion) by July this year.

More than 160,000 people were forced from their homes after the meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi plant following an earthquake and tsunami in March 2011, the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl 25 years earlier.

– See more at: http://www.safety-reporter.com/articleview/25721-japan-acknowledges-possible-radiation-casualty-at-fukushima-nuclear-plant#sthash.K90hOHgo.dpuf

Full story

Strong earthquake hits south of tokyo-no tsunami danger


AP Associated Press
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/strong-earthquake-hits-south-of-tokyo-no-tsunami-danger/ar-AAbZvTw?ocid=mailsignout

TOKYO (AP) — A strong earthquake struck off an island chain south of Tokyo on Tuesday, but officials said there was no danger of a tsunami.

Japan’s Meteorological Agency said the earthquake measured a preliminary magnitude of 6.9 and was very deep, about 480 kilometers (300 miles) below the ocean’s surface. Deep earthquakes generally cause less damage.

The U.S. Geological Survey put the magnitude at 6.3. Discrepancies often occur in preliminary readings because of slightly different equipment, locations and methods used in estimates, according to seismological experts.

The Japanese agency said the quake was centered west of the Ogasawara island chain in the Pacific Ocean about 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) south of Tokyo.