typhoon

REUTERS
By Elaine Lies

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s weather agency on Monday issued emergency warnings to urge people in the country’s southern islands to take maximum precautions as a super typhoon described as a “once in decades storm” is set to rake the Okinawa island chain with heavy rain and powerful winds.

Typhoons spread Fukushima fallout, study warns

Yahoo News
AFP NewsAFP News – Fri, Nov 29, 2013

Typhoons that hit Japan each year are helping spread radioactive material from the Fukushima nuclear disaster into the country’s waterways, researchers say.

Contaminated soil gets washed away by the high winds and rain and deposited in streams and rivers, a joint study by France’s Climate and Environmental Science laboratory (LSCE) and Tsukuba University in Japan showed.

An earthquake-sparked tsunami slammed into the Fukushima plant in March 2011, sending reactors into meltdown and sparking the worst atomic accident in a generation.

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Tsunami Debris ‘Island’ Headed for US? NOAA Sets Record Straight

Yahoo News
LiveScience.com
By By Denise Chow

Debris from the deadly tsunami that struck Japan in 2011 is drifting across the Pacific Ocean toward North America, and will likely continue to wash onto North American shores over the next few years, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

“A significant amount of debris has already arrived on U.S. and Canadian shores, and it will likely continue arriving in the same scattered way over the next several years,” NOAA officials said in a statement. “As we get further into the fall and winter storm season, NOAA and partners are expecting to see more debris coming ashore in North America, including tsunami debris mixed in with the ‘normal’ marine debris that we see every year.”

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Fuel Removal From Fukushima’s Reactor 4 Threatens ‘Apocalyptic’ Scenario

Published on Thursday, October 24, 2013 by Common Dreams
Fuel Removal From Fukushima’s Reactor 4 Threatens ‘Apocalyptic’ Scenario
In November, TEPCO set to begin to remove fuel rods whose radiation matches the fallout of 14,000 Hiroshima bombs

– Andrea Germanos, staff writer
An operation with potentially “apocalyptic” consequences is expected to begin in a little over two weeks from now – “as early as November 8” – at Fukushima’s damaged and sinking Reactor 4, when plant operator TEPCO will attempt to remove over 1300 spent fuel rods holding the radiation equivalent of 14,000 Hiroshima bombs from a spent fuel storage tank perched on the reactor’s upper floor.

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Typhoon, mudslides kill 17 in Japan; 50 missing

Associated Press
MARI YAMAGUCHI

Yahoo News
TOKYO (AP) — A typhoon caused deadly mudslides that buried people and destroyed homes on a Japanese island Wednesday before sweeping up the Pacific coast, grounding hundreds of flights and disrupting Tokyo’s transportation during the morning rush. At least 17 deaths were reported and nearly 50 people were missing.

Hardest hit from Typhoon Wipha was Izu Oshima island, which is about 120 kilometers (75 miles) south of Tokyo. Rescuers found 16 bodies, most of them buried by mudslides, police and town officials said. Dozens of homes were destroyed, and about 45 people were missing.

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Typhoon threatens Japan; precautions at Fukushima nuclear plant

Reuters by Aaron Sheldrick | Reuters

By Aaron Sheldrick
TOKYO (Reuters) – A once-in-a-decade typhoon threatened Japan on Tuesday, disrupting travel and shipping and forcing precautions to be taken at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear power plant.
Typhoon Wipha is moving across the Pacific straight towards the capital, Tokyo, and is expected to make landfall during the morning rush hour on Wednesday, bringing hurricane-force winds to the metropolitan area of 30 million people.
The center of the storm was 860 km (535 miles) southwest of Tokyo at 0800 GMT, the Japan Meteorological Agency said on its website. It was moving north-northeast at 35 kph (22 mph).
The storm had weakened as it headed north over the sea but was still packing sustained winds of about 140 kph (87 mph) with gusts as high as 194 kph (120 mph), the agency said.
The agency issued warnings for Tokyo of heavy rain, flooding and gales, and advised people to be prepared to leave their homes quickly and to avoid unnecessary travel.

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Typhoon hits Japan as Fukushima operator releases water

An overturned sightseeing boat is stuck by a bridge after the Katsura River was overflooded by torrential rains caused by a powerful typhoon in Kyoto, western Japan, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Typhoon Man-yi, one of the most powerful storms to lash Japan this season, was bearing down on Japan and went past Tokyo on Monday, leaving one dead and dumping torrential rains, damaging homes and flooding parts of the country's popular tourist destination of Kyoto, where hundreds of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate to shelters. (AP Photo/Kyodo News) JAPAN OUT, CREDIT MANDATORY

Typhoon Man-yi hit Japan Monday, leaving two people dead and forcing the operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant to release rainwater with low levels of radiation into the ocean.

The powerful typhoon made landfall in Toyohashi, Aichi prefecture, shortly before 8:00 am (2300 GMT Sunday), packing gusts of up to 162 kilometres (100 miles) per hour, the Japan Meteorological Agency said.

Public broadcaster NHK said a 71-year-old woman was found dead as a landslide engulfed her house in Shiga prefecture, while a 77-year-old woman was also confirmed dead in a separate mudslide in Fukui prefecture, near Shiga.

Four people were still missing while 128 others were injured with more than 4,000 houses flooded and at least 270 houses damaged by strong wind or landslides, NHK said.  <Full story>