New Robots Deployed at Fukushima

The Wall Street Journal
JapanRealTime

A team of rival Japanese companies unveiled a new family of robots to help workerswith the daunting task of decommissioning the three reactors that went into meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant in 2011.

Fukushima operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. hopes to use the robots to begin decontaminating the second and third floors of the reactor buildings sometime after April. The robots are the latest tools developed in Japan’s trial-and-error struggles to clean up the nuclear disaster– which even the most optimistic say will take about half a century.

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7.0 quake off Japan coast triggers minor tsunami

November 15, 2015
The Gulf Today

TOKYO: A powerful 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck off the south-western coast of Japan early on Saturday, authorities said, with a small tsunami observed on one island but no major damage reported.

The US Geological Survey (USGS) put the epicentre of the shallow quake about 160 kilometres (100 miles) from the town of Makurazaki in south-western Japan.

It was centred about 10 kilometres under the ocean floor and struck at 5:51am (20:51GMT on Friday), the USGS and Japan’s Meteorological Agency said.

The Meteorological Agency issued a tsunami advisory as a result of the quake but cancelled it about 90 minutes later.

A tsunami measuring 30 centimetres (about one foot) in height was observed on the southern island of Nakanoshima, it said. No major damage from the quake or tsunami was reported, while a pair of nuclear reactors on the southern island of Kyushu were unaffected, its operator said.

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Japan acknowledges possible radiation casualty at Fukushima nuclear plant

TOKYO (Reuters) — Japan on Tuesday acknowledged the first possible casualty from radiation at the wrecked Fukushima nuclear power plant, a worker who was diagnosed with cancer after the crisis broke out in 2011.

The health ministry’s recognition of radiation as a possible cause may set back efforts to recover from the disaster, as the government and the nuclear industry have been at pains to say that the health effects from radiation have been minimal.

It may also add to compensation payments that had reached more than 7 trillion yen ($76.3 billion) by July this year.

More than 160,000 people were forced from their homes after the meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi plant following an earthquake and tsunami in March 2011, the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl 25 years earlier.

– See more at: http://www.safety-reporter.com/articleview/25721-japan-acknowledges-possible-radiation-casualty-at-fukushima-nuclear-plant#sthash.K90hOHgo.dpuf

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Japan restarts first nuclear reactor since Fukushima disaster

fukushimanuclearplant

CNN

Updated 10:22 AM ET, Tue August 11, 2015

| Video Source: CNN

(CNN)Japan has restarted its first nuclear reactor since the Fukushima disaster in March, 2011.

Kyushu Electric Power Company told CNN Tuesday that ithad reactivated No. 1 reactor at its Sendai nuclear power plant in Kagoshima Prefecture, on the southern island of Kyushu.

The plant’s second reactor could be restarted in October, it added.

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Otonowa fundraising Concert July 12, 2015

Otonowa – A Benefit Concert at Piedmont Piano in Oakland
Having toured Northern Japan in aiding the relief efforts there, Otonowa (Sound Circle) will be performing jazz interpretations of Japanese folk and pop melodies, employing traditional Japanese instruments to compliment the standard jazz quartet instrumentation. It will be an evening of music, discussion of the group’s ongoing mission, light snacks and beverages, and hope that contributions can be made to make the upcoming tour as successful as the previous tours.

Featuring Masaru Koga, Ken Noriyuki Okada, Art Hirahara, and Akira Tana

Sunday, July 12, 2015 at 7:30pm
at Piedmont Piano Company
1728 San Pablo Ave. (at 18th), Oakland, CA

All the members of the group and staff support are donating their time and efforts. The costs of the tour are entirely dependent on the generous donations of music supporters who recognize the power of spiritual healing through music.

FREE ADMISSION – donations welcome

To RSVP, please call (510) 547-8188

For more details, visit http://piedmontpiano.com/concerts/150712otonowa.html

http://www.otonowa-usa.com

This Scorpion-Shaped Robot Will Enter One of Fukushima’s Reactors

SMARTNEWS Keeping you current

The nuclear power plant’s owners still don’t know exactly what is going on inside the three reactors that melted down

The three reactors that melted down at Fukushima Daiichi’s nuclear power plant are still quite dangerous. Radiation levels remain too high for humans to enter. But the reactors need to be fully decommissioned and repaired. So robots are rolling in to give experts some eyes on the inside. For Popular Science, Mary Beth Griggs reports on the latest mechanical helper, which should make its foray into the plant at the end of August.

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Strong earthquake hits south of tokyo-no tsunami danger


AP Associated Press
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/strong-earthquake-hits-south-of-tokyo-no-tsunami-danger/ar-AAbZvTw?ocid=mailsignout

TOKYO (AP) — A strong earthquake struck off an island chain south of Tokyo on Tuesday, but officials said there was no danger of a tsunami.

Japan’s Meteorological Agency said the earthquake measured a preliminary magnitude of 6.9 and was very deep, about 480 kilometers (300 miles) below the ocean’s surface. Deep earthquakes generally cause less damage.

The U.S. Geological Survey put the magnitude at 6.3. Discrepancies often occur in preliminary readings because of slightly different equipment, locations and methods used in estimates, according to seismological experts.

The Japanese agency said the quake was centered west of the Ogasawara island chain in the Pacific Ocean about 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) south of Tokyo.

Virginia Tech robot enters contest centered around solutions for future Fukushima-like disasters

The Roanoke Times

Posted: Friday, June 5, 2015 3:30 pm

BLACKSBURG — The nuclear disaster four years ago in Japan after a tsunami hit the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant limited human involvement, particularly at the start, because of the radiation involved.

But John Seminatore, who’s pursuing a doctorate in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech, said a robot could have done the job to limit or alleviate the damage.

“It’s not a very complicated task,” he said about the actual pumping of water on reactors, something that could have helped the situation in Japan. “The thing is that robots can do things people can’t.”

Seminatore and some other Virginia Tech students are currently in Pomona, California, where they are participating in a robotics competition hosted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency — the agency within the U.S. Department of Defense that is involved in developing new technologies for the military.

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Japan earthquake: Large but very deep temblor strikes offshore

CNBC
Saturday, May 30, 2015

A powerful and extremely deep earthquake struck near remote Japanese islands and shook Tokyo on Saturday, but officials said there was no danger of a tsunami, and no injuries or damage were immediately reported.

The magnitude-8.5 offshore earthquake struck off the Ogasawara islands at 8:24 p.m. at a depth of 370 miles, Japan’s Meteorological Agency said. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a magnitude of 7.8 and a depth of 421 miles.