Otonowa fundraising Concert July 12, 2015

Otonowa – A Benefit Concert at Piedmont Piano in Oakland
Having toured Northern Japan in aiding the relief efforts there, Otonowa (Sound Circle) will be performing jazz interpretations of Japanese folk and pop melodies, employing traditional Japanese instruments to compliment the standard jazz quartet instrumentation. It will be an evening of music, discussion of the group’s ongoing mission, light snacks and beverages, and hope that contributions can be made to make the upcoming tour as successful as the previous tours.

Featuring Masaru Koga, Ken Noriyuki Okada, Art Hirahara, and Akira Tana

Sunday, July 12, 2015 at 7:30pm
at Piedmont Piano Company
1728 San Pablo Ave. (at 18th), Oakland, CA

All the members of the group and staff support are donating their time and efforts. The costs of the tour are entirely dependent on the generous donations of music supporters who recognize the power of spiritual healing through music.

FREE ADMISSION – donations welcome

To RSVP, please call (510) 547-8188

For more details, visit http://piedmontpiano.com/concerts/150712otonowa.html

http://www.otonowa-usa.com

This Scorpion-Shaped Robot Will Enter One of Fukushima’s Reactors

SMARTNEWS Keeping you current

The nuclear power plant’s owners still don’t know exactly what is going on inside the three reactors that melted down

The three reactors that melted down at Fukushima Daiichi’s nuclear power plant are still quite dangerous. Radiation levels remain too high for humans to enter. But the reactors need to be fully decommissioned and repaired. So robots are rolling in to give experts some eyes on the inside. For Popular Science, Mary Beth Griggs reports on the latest mechanical helper, which should make its foray into the plant at the end of August.

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Strong earthquake hits south of tokyo-no tsunami danger


AP Associated Press
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/strong-earthquake-hits-south-of-tokyo-no-tsunami-danger/ar-AAbZvTw?ocid=mailsignout

TOKYO (AP) — A strong earthquake struck off an island chain south of Tokyo on Tuesday, but officials said there was no danger of a tsunami.

Japan’s Meteorological Agency said the earthquake measured a preliminary magnitude of 6.9 and was very deep, about 480 kilometers (300 miles) below the ocean’s surface. Deep earthquakes generally cause less damage.

The U.S. Geological Survey put the magnitude at 6.3. Discrepancies often occur in preliminary readings because of slightly different equipment, locations and methods used in estimates, according to seismological experts.

The Japanese agency said the quake was centered west of the Ogasawara island chain in the Pacific Ocean about 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) south of Tokyo.

Virginia Tech robot enters contest centered around solutions for future Fukushima-like disasters

The Roanoke Times

Posted: Friday, June 5, 2015 3:30 pm

BLACKSBURG — The nuclear disaster four years ago in Japan after a tsunami hit the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant limited human involvement, particularly at the start, because of the radiation involved.

But John Seminatore, who’s pursuing a doctorate in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech, said a robot could have done the job to limit or alleviate the damage.

“It’s not a very complicated task,” he said about the actual pumping of water on reactors, something that could have helped the situation in Japan. “The thing is that robots can do things people can’t.”

Seminatore and some other Virginia Tech students are currently in Pomona, California, where they are participating in a robotics competition hosted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency — the agency within the U.S. Department of Defense that is involved in developing new technologies for the military.

story

 

Japan earthquake: Large but very deep temblor strikes offshore

CNBC
Saturday, May 30, 2015

A powerful and extremely deep earthquake struck near remote Japanese islands and shook Tokyo on Saturday, but officials said there was no danger of a tsunami, and no injuries or damage were immediately reported.

The magnitude-8.5 offshore earthquake struck off the Ogasawara islands at 8:24 p.m. at a depth of 370 miles, Japan’s Meteorological Agency said. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a magnitude of 7.8 and a depth of 421 miles.

Presentation Contest / Students impress audiences with ideas, skills

JAPAN NEWS
December 24, 2014

By Rie Tagawa / Japan News Staff Writer

Anna Ota of Yokohama City University won the Grand Prize of the third All Japan Student English Presentation Contest held in Tokyo earlier this month.

The freshman presented her idea that she found during a camping trip program for children in Fukushima Prefecture, at the annual presentation competition held in Yomiuri Otemachi Hall in Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo, on Dec. 6. Students were asked to convey their ideas in four-minute presentations on one of three given topics.

Ota, 19, responded to the prompt “propose a plan to bolster reconstruction efforts in the areas hit by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake at an international forum.” After the ceremony, she said, “I’m happy with the award, but the next step, I hope, will be to turn my words into action.”

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Honda’s “Building Dreams of Friendship” Float Reunites Japan Earthquake Survivors with U.S. Military First Responders at the 2015 Rose Parade

Yahoo Finance
Press Release: American Honda Motor Co., Inc. – 6 hours ago

– Students impacted by the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami of 2011 and U.S. military service members who participated in the humanitarian relief effort to ride float
– Honda will lead the Rose Parade for the fifth year as presenting sponsor

TORRANCE, Calif., Dec. 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Honda’s 2015 Rose Parade float entry, Building Dreams of Friendship, will lead the 126th Rose Parade presented by Honda. The float celebrates the friendship shared by the United States and Japan through the TOMODACHI Initiative, and pays tribute to the resilience of the people of Tohoku, Japan. The float also seeks to highlight the ongoing reconstruction effort in the regions affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami of 2011, and pays tribute to the role played by the United States military in the humanitarian response. Themed “Inspiring Stories,” the Rose Parade will take place Thurs., Jan. 1, 2015.

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One day, robots may work in zones too dangerous for humans

robots

Washington Post

December 22
Dennis Hong first spied Japan’s ruined nuclear power plant from a bus wrapped in plastic. A hefty layer of protection guarded the seats, floors and handles from radioactive dust. Hong wore a face mask and gloves to limit his exposure. Like the other passengers, he had dressed in old clothes that he was willing to toss after the trip.

More than three years earlier, after an earthquake and tsunami battered Japan’s eastern coast, portions of the Fukushima Daiichi power station blew, blasting radiation into the sea and sky. Today, villages outside the plant still lie as barren as ghost towns. Along the coast, smashed buildings, flipped cars and train tracks twisted like taffy stand as reminders of the catastrophe.

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Global eco-radiation research institute opens in Fukushima

ASAHI SHIMBUN

December 04, 2014

FUKUSHIMA–With its team of international researchers, Fukushima University’s Institute of Environmental Radioactivity moved into full-scale operation on Dec. 3.

An official ceremony was held to mark the opening of its new two-story-high facility built with a government subsidy of roughly 1.8 billion yen ($15 million).

Established in July 2013, the institute studies the effects of the fallout from the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant accident triggered by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster as well as various forms of environmental contamination globally.

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